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PRODUCT PIPELINE

Recce Pharmaceuticals is addressing the historic lack of innovation in antibiotic drug development and the growing need for effective antibiotics.

R&D Pipeline

R327 is currently undergoing two clinical trials: a Phase I safety study to assess IV infusion of RECCE® 327 in 80 healthy male subjects as a single ascending dose; and a Phase I/II study to assess topical application of RECCE® 327 in burn wound infections.
For more information on our Phase I clinical trial or to register your interest as a participant visit the CMAX website here

For more details and updates please refer to specific company announcements.

Asset Route of administrationIndicationsDiscoveryPreclinicalPhase IPhase IIPhase IIINext data readoutMarket Size
Anti-bacterial programs
      Phase I interim data readout Q4 2021 47-50 million cases worldwide
      To start post Phase II in sepsis    
R327 Topical Wound infections including infected burns
        Phase I/II readout Q4 2021 11 million burn wound cases requiring medical intervention. Majority of which escalate to infection
R435 Oral R529 Helicobacter pylori in stomach ulcers
          Up to 4.4 billion worldwide
Anti-viral programs
R327 Nasal COVID Influenza
           
R529 IV and Intranasal COVID
           

The Clinical Pathway to Antibiotic Approval

Antibiotic resistance is an urgent global health threat. Multi-drug resistant bacteria, or superbugs, are on the rise and have outpaced the development of effective antibiotics – threatening our ability to treat common infections and support modern medicine. Globally, over six million people die each year in hospitals due to sepsis, a life-threatening response to an infection for which no specific treatments exist. Doctors treating sepsis patients are in a race against time, with mortality rates increasing by 6% each hour if left untreated.

RECCE® 327 shows potential to reduce drug resistance against traditional antibiotics. Introducing a new treatment option can reduce the use of traditional antibiotics, lowering the selective pressure on bacteria that leads to the development of resistance.

There are three distinct phases of clinical evaluation prior to approval for new drugs:

Phase I

These studies are usually conducted in 20-80 healthy volunteers and aim to determine if the drug is safe, if it has any side effects and how it is metabolised and excreted.

Phase II

These studies are usually conducted in 20-80 unwell patients. The focus in Phase 2 study is on effectiveness and data on whether the drug works in people who have a certain disease or condition. Safety and short-term side effects continue to be evaluated. At the end of Phase II study the drug developer and the FDA will discuss the structure and size of the final phase.

Phase III

These studies enrol a much larger number of patients than Phase I and Phase II study. The aim is to gather more information about safety and effectiveness of the drug. Phase III studies look at use of the drug in different populations and different dosages and using the drug in combination with other drugs and how it interacts.

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